Smoking in Public Places

This paper seeks to understand the detrimental effects of smoking in public places. The paper sorts to expose the health and social effects of smoking. Studies reveal that a number of the exposure to secondhand smoking from burning tobacco products causes diseases and premature death among no smokers.  Recent data show that deaths in UK in 2003 clocked twelve thousand two hundred with about fifty people dying from smoke in the workplaces (CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). This demonstrates the need for ensuring favorable policies for adequate health status.  The growing trend of smokers illustrates that mainly the young generation aged twenty-five to thirty-four and the elder generation enjoy smoking. With the urge of smoking becoming insatiable, most of these people, find themselves smoking in public places such as restaurants, hotels, school corridors among other areas.  The particular experiences are to analyze the working generation collect data on their smoking trends to assess the behavior and effects of smoking. This group consists mainly of providers in the family set up. Therefore understanding their smoking patterns will enable the reader to realize the implication of smoking with their family and also the environment at large. The paper aims at enlightening the reader to understand the impact of nicotine contained in cigarettes. Studies reveal that in 2007, seventy-four percent of the smokers wanted to give up the habit. Due to their addiction levels, this has become difficult (CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

This paper investigates the effect of smoking in public places. The paper tries to ascertain the need for smoking zones pegging this to the impact of cigarettes on other people. The research is limited in a time scope of three months. This will enable activities such as questionnaires and interviews to be conducted at ease. The study aims at narrowing the research to the local county focusing its emphasis on the working generation. Limiting the paper to the county area will facilitate data collection. Random sampling will form the basis of selecting neighborhood areas to assess. The youth regards smoking as a ‘cool’ and admirable activity with little knowledge on its effects while smoking in public. The questionnaire will contain questions aimed at knowing the behavior trends of smokers (Badke). Questions such as how many cigarettes does one smoke in a day, where do they smoke, which brand do they prefer, amongst others will be included. These questions will aid in understanding how many people respect smoking policies of not smoking in public, how they view public smoking, and whether they abide by the regulations on smoking.

Research strategies are the techniques applied in order to carry out investigations on a particular topic. They provide the researcher with means of having a neutral take so as to conclude on the various aspects of the problem. The research strategy consists of a framework of conducting the study. The first step is to read documents pertaining to the topic. Get the basic concept and feeling towards the topic. Visiting large web sites on the topic sentence will familiarize the read reports with actual recordings (Badke). This is followed by determining the scope of the study. The area, age group under study, venue for smoking, the number of smoking zones provided, amongst others from research matter. Data collection and sampling is conducted using methods such as personal interviews, filling in questionnaires, taking photos of the state of smoking zones among others (Badke). This is then analyzed to provide reports on the smoking trends providing information on the general perception towards public smoking.

Some of the sources for the research include:

Badke, William. Research Strategies. Bloomington: Library of Congress catalog, 2014.

Barron, Kevin. Smoking In Public Places. London: Milbank, 2006.

Biddle, Bruce. The Unacknowledged Disaster. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2014.

CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 2014. 26 March 2015 <http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/secondhand_smoke/protection/improve_health/>.

Hunter, W. The Toxicological Data For public health. New York: Pergamon Press, 2007.

“Statistics on Smoking: England,” 2013. Health and Social Care information center. 26 March 2015 <www.hscic.gov.uk.enquiries@hscic.gov.uk>.

Works Cited

Badke, William. Research Strategies. Bloomington: Library of Congress catalog, 2014.

Barron, Kevin. Smoking In Public Places. London: Milbank, 2006.

Biddle, Bruce. The Unacknowledged Disaster. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2014.

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