Crucifixion during the Roman Empire

Death by crucifixion is an ancient practice, which was utilized frequently by the Romans to punish criminals in the society. Crucifixion was a process, which involved excruciating pain and humiliation for the convicted criminal; it was necessitated by the need to discourage other citizens from engaging in crime especially against the leadership. The offender was forced to carry a huge wooden cross along the streets, as the guards in charge of the process continued to inflict pain through whipping and beating (Weber, 1979) Upon reaching the destination, where crucifixion was to take place, the convict was nailed onto the cross using nails measuring approximately 18 centimeters in length and 10 millimeters in width. Thereafter, the cross, along with the convict, was erected vertically on the ground and it remained in that position until after the criminal was confirmed dead. However, it is believed that some of the crosses were fixed permanently on the ground to serve as a constant reminder to the passersby and local inhabitants that death by crucifixion was the ultimate destiny for criminals (Hewitt, 1932).
Let's make that grade!
Grademiners.com Coupons