How to Write a Persuasive Speech on Abortions

How to Write a Persuasive Speech on Abortions

Are you one of those people who are scared stiff of public speech? Don’t worry – it won’t prevent you from writing a good speech on paper. And when you have to deliver it? Well, let’s take one problem at a time.
Let’s talk about writing a speech on abortions. The topic is evergreen, at least until we agree on a single solution worldwide, and rather controversial. That is, there are people who feel deeply for or against it.

Ideally, your speech has to convince people who have opposing views to yours to think otherwise. In practice, if you at least make them admit that an opposing point of view has the right to exist, you have already succeeded.
How do you deliver a good, persuasive speech on abortions? By following all the best practices of speech writing, of course! We will go over such practices in this blog post.

Getting started

You have probably written enough papers in your life to know that introduction can be the make-it-or-break-it kind of moment. If you mumble, if you sound hesitant or not interesting enough, your audience will “tune out” and stop listening. That’s why a strong, attention drawing introduction is a MUST.

How about a baffling statistical fact?

“Last month, 20 women were unable to perform abortions for various reasons that included financial difficulties, religious views of their partners, and the lack of access to medicine. 8 of them died while going through self-performed abortions.”

(Make sure to use real statistics, of course – you are not telling a scary fairytale!)

Or maybe a question?

“Are you playing God or do you think it’s acceptable for a mere mortal to decide on whether another human being should live or die?”

Different rules apply in speeches than in academic papers – you can and should be emotional, passionate, and prone to exaggerate.

By the way, are you trying to sound fancy and sophisticated in your speech? Don’t. It is always difficult to understand for people who will be listening to your speech rather than reading it. Write as you speak – the primary rule of copywriting applies here in the full scope.

Oh, and the storytelling! You have already started with a strong introduction, so why not build on it? People like a good story, so capitalize on it. Don’t take it literally. You don’t have to tell a life story with your speech – just build it like you would build a story with a climax and a resolution.

By the way, the structure matters A LOT. You should:

  • Present your arguments starting from the weakest to the strongest.
  • Make your introduction strong, but only in its ability to draw attention.
  • Showcase the most powerful of arguments, ones that can hardly be refuted, in the final part of your speech so as to make a lasting impression.

Be concise. If you want to ramble, you could probably go and give a speech right now. But if you want to make an impression, you would have to prepare for weeks. The thing is, to deliver your speech in concise, clear, strong words, you’d have to work a lot. You’d have to “kill your darlings” during the editing stage, cutting ruthlessly the parts that underperform.

The fewer words you use, the stronger they are. The more value they have. But they also have to be carefully selected to have the required value.

Last but not least – make sure that your arguments or points are built logically, one on the basis of another. You want your narration to flow, to feel natural and expected. Not forced in any way.

Refrain from using strong language and giving cold turkey – these things do not contribute any value. Your goal is to take your listeners (or readers if you are not going to deliver your speech) on an adventure. Make them feel what you feel (expressive language), appeal to reason where necessary (cold facts and dry theory), exaggerate a little if necessary – your arsenal is much wider than what you’d have in a regular academic paper. Make sure to use all of the means available to you, or you might end up with a speech that won’t fulfill its purpose.