Making Your Essay on Nature Stand out, and Mesmerize

Many students make a crucial mistake when receiving an essay on nature to write. They think it’s going to be a walk in the park, a piece of delicious writing cake one can easily have a bite of.

However, an essay about nature that brings you an A is a piece much more in-depth and complex than shortsighted classmen usually imagine. First and foremost, the essay has to be short, yet very insightful and meaningful.

It must fascinate just like a herd of clouds being spurred by mid-autumn wind. It must charm like an early flower hatching out of a snow cover. And it definitely has to evoke emotions, so that the reader ends the piece with an impression so evergreen she starts rereading your work once again.

Being sloppy and snappy while doing an essay on nature is the first and most grievous mistake one can make. Yes, you don’t have to research anything, but you do need to come up with a truly irresistible paper that is accompanied by your teacher’s gee-whizzes after every passage of reading.

The winning structure of an essay about nature

This type of essay usually comes as a narrative or descriptive piece and is based on your personal feelings, emotions and experience. But, natural essay isn’t just a description of Niagara Falls, for example. It’s both a description and reflection of what imprint Niagara Falls left on your life.

First off, start your essay with depicting an image of a certain place so tempting and colorful, and engaging that the reader gets charmed by every sentence of it. Your introduction must be so moving your teacher forgets about everything she planned to do that day.
Then, devote approximately two paragraphs in your work to a personal story, preferably from your life experience, that is somehow related to the place you’ve just outlined in the opening paragraph. It can be romantic, like your first kiss under that very same old oak in the middle of a green sea of grass, or it can be dramatic, like en elk popping out from a dark forest right in front of your dad’s car. There’s definitely has to be an unexpected twist in that story, a hook that makes reader shiver, wow, tremble or exited.

In the meantime, the story doesn’t end here. It goes on into a couple of odd passages where your story shines with new palettes, like how you met the girl you first kissed after ten years of not hearing about each other, or like the whole bander of little elks appearing on the road right behind their mother.

How did you feel at that moment? What happened next? How your life changed? Or, maybe, some questions should be left unanswered? Your concluding paragraph is about to either lift the veil and drop all cards on a table or keep the curtain down, leaving your reader a goodly aftertaste she will have a sense of the whole day.